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Rewarding cooperation

Cooperation with architects and interior designers was very rewarding. Numerous were hotel projects during the 1970s in Helsinki with Hotel Hesperia, Intercontinental and Marski, and Hilton Hotels worldwide. Finlandia Hall and national theatres were among the many public buildings and theatres. Finnair planes were furnished with upholstery fabrics, wall dividers and the lightweight suitable sized 90cm x 140cm snooze blankets in wool/mohair together with cotton/linen placemats and napkins were added for the long-distance flights with Finnair’s DC8-62 which was truly a flying showroom of her interior textile design. Sabena of Belgium and Royal Air Maroc had also their aircraft upholstered with Metsovaara textiles.

Design of interior textiles for public spaces has always been Marjatta Metsovaara’s main activity. To complement the architecture of buildings, Marjatta Metsovaara dressed large surfaces such as walls and floors. Hotel Kuusamo in Kuusamo with Kaisla (reed) in 1966 is a perfect example of a superb floor covering in black and white. This design was reused for print production in many 2-color ranges at Tampella at the same time.

Marjatta Metsovaara also got acquainted with building materials and was most aware of the purpose of the spaces to be decorated and the image that could be created for the building. Architects and interior designers were then consulted to know their wishes for interior textiles. Once the colors were decided, it was easier to start designing interior textiles suitable for the environment. Interior textiles also had to be in balance with building materials such as wood, metal, and marble. If suitable textiles could not be found from Metsovaara’s collection, the textile artist designed these.

The Belgian weaving mill was most modern with special machines and large laboratories for material and color research, which was not usual in Finland yet. As a textile artist Marjatta Metsovaara emphasizes the importance of cooperation in everything she does and thinks the designer is the initiator of a long production process before the design would be made into a finished fabric and placed as part of the interior. At Metsovaara, planning and creative work were rewarding.

Back to history

Rewarding cooperation

Cooperation with architects and interior designers was very rewarding. Numerous were hotel projects during the 1970s in Helsinki with Hotel Hesperia, Intercontinental and Marski, and Hilton Hotels worldwide. Finlandia Hall and national theatres were among the many public buildings and theatres. Finnair planes were furnished with upholstery fabrics, wall dividers and the lightweight suitable sized 90cm x 140cm snooze blankets in wool/mohair together with cotton/linen placemats and napkins were added for the long-distance flights with Finnair’s DC8-62 which was truly a flying showroom of her interior textile design. Sabena of Belgium and Royal Air Maroc had also their aircraft upholstered with Metsovaara textiles.

Design of interior textiles for public spaces has always been Marjatta Metsovaara’s main activity. To complement the architecture of buildings, Marjatta Metsovaara dressed large surfaces such as walls and floors. Hotel Kuusamo in Kuusamo with Kaisla (reed) in 1966 is a perfect example of a superb floor covering in black and white. This design was reused for print production in many 2-color ranges at Tampella at the same time.

Marjatta Metsovaara also got acquainted with building materials and was most aware of the purpose of the spaces to be decorated and the image that could be created for the building. Architects and interior designers were then consulted to know their wishes for interior textiles. Once the colors were decided, it was easier to start designing interior textiles suitable for the environment. Interior textiles also had to be in balance with building materials such as wood, metal, and marble. If suitable textiles could not be found from Metsovaara’s collection, the textile artist designed these.

The Belgian weaving mill was most modern with special machines and large laboratories for material and color research, which was not usual in Finland yet. As a textile artist Marjatta Metsovaara emphasizes the importance of cooperation in everything she does and thinks the designer is the initiator of a long production process before the design would be made into a finished fabric and placed as part of the interior. At Metsovaara, planning and creative work were rewarding.

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