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Printed fabrics

Metsovaara got involved in the design of printed fabrics quite late when it began cooperating with the Tampella textile factory in 1962 when Salon Leninkitukku Oy’s CEO Risto Laaksonen asked Marjatta Metsovaara to design a Finnish and personal clothing fabric.

The first printed fabric model, Kukka (flower), was printed at the Lapinniemi (Lappi peninsula) plant of Tampella Oy near Tampere. Marjatta Metsovaara improved the design with repeat, increased pattern size, and improved fabric construction for her own commercial use as a perfect cotton print for home use and clothing. The quality was named Lappi-satin and became wrongly translated as Lapland satin. As a design, Kukka was very trendy with combined different shades of the same color. Printed on Lappi-satin, it sold over 2mio meters, with sales in the U.S only reaching 1mio meters.

Kukka was also developed for other home textile products such as curtains, parasols, fabrics for hammocks, garden textiles, materials for rollers and blinds, canvas fabric, and plastic-coated satin cotton table tops for outdoor. A woven variation in the wool mix for modern home furniture has also existed. Green & Green wanted the design for its umbrellas, so the fabric was made in smaller patterns in nylon. Eero Rislakki designed the wooden handles for this umbrella collection. Other print designs of Metsovaara were used for these.

The richly shaped and colorful fabric designs of Tampella’s own products were made as printed cotton and non-woven fabrics and, to less extent, linen and jute fabrics. The Lappi-satin woven at the Tampella mill in Lapinniemi was made in 21 different monochrome wefts. It was strong, resilient, and wrinkle-free.

In 1966 it improved as ideal cotton for being printed with reactive dyes already used before that were perfect printing inks thanks to their brightness and clean tones. Marjatta Metsovaara paid special attention to the colors and was even put to the color blindness test. She passed brilliantly.  She saw the red colors better but didn’t say that to the color masters at Tampella. The resistance of the colors to light and washing was excellent on this new quality. Metsovaara sold yearly over 500.000 meters of this fabric. Timo Sarpaneva was using the fabric for his Ambiente print design. 

 

Back to history

Printed fabrics

Metsovaara got involved in the design of printed fabrics quite late when it began cooperating with the Tampella textile factory in 1962 when Salon Leninkitukku Oy’s CEO Risto Laaksonen asked Marjatta Metsovaara to design a Finnish and personal clothing fabric.

The first printed fabric model, Kukka (flower), was printed at the Lapinniemi (Lappi peninsula) plant of Tampella Oy near Tampere. Marjatta Metsovaara improved the design with repeat, increased pattern size, and improved fabric construction for her own commercial use as a perfect cotton print for home use and clothing. The quality was named Lappi-satin and became wrongly translated as Lapland satin. As a design, Kukka was very trendy with combined different shades of the same color. Printed on Lappi-satin, it sold over 2mio meters, with sales in the U.S only reaching 1mio meters.

Kukka was also developed for other home textile products such as curtains, parasols, fabrics for hammocks, garden textiles, materials for rollers and blinds, canvas fabric, and plastic-coated satin cotton table tops for outdoor. A woven variation in the wool mix for modern home furniture has also existed. Green & Green wanted the design for its umbrellas, so the fabric was made in smaller patterns in nylon. Eero Rislakki designed the wooden handles for this umbrella collection. Other print designs of Metsovaara were used for these.

The richly shaped and colorful fabric designs of Tampella’s own products were made as printed cotton and non-woven fabrics and, to less extent, linen and jute fabrics. The Lappi-satin woven at the Tampella mill in Lapinniemi was made in 21 different monochrome wefts. It was strong, resilient, and wrinkle-free.

In 1966 it improved as ideal cotton for being printed with reactive dyes already used before that were perfect printing inks thanks to their brightness and clean tones. Marjatta Metsovaara paid special attention to the colors and was even put to the color blindness test. She passed brilliantly.  She saw the red colors better but didn’t say that to the color masters at Tampella. The resistance of the colors to light and washing was excellent on this new quality. Metsovaara sold yearly over 500.000 meters of this fabric. Timo Sarpaneva was using the fabric for his Ambiente print design. 

 

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