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Furniture fabrics

Metsovaara started producing furniture fabrics in 1954 for Artek and in large quantities for Asko. Furniture fabrics like Ripsi, Comfort I, and Comfort II were of high quality and had up to 40 color options. These fabrics were well suited to modern architecture and design furniture. The best example was Comfort II (60% viscose/40% wool), launched in 1960 with the most extensive color range for which Marjatta Metsovaara got the Gold Medal at the XII Triennial in Milan. It was made to feel more pleasant and shinier than the Comfort I in 100% wool which was also presented there.  Another example was the Ilo (joy) fabrics with black cotton warp in uni or different striped designs (10% cotton/25% rayon/65% wool). These wonderful fabrics were mainly used for projects.

Modern furniture showed curved and concave surfaces on which Metsovaara’s smooth, flexible and hard wear-resistant upholstery fabrics were well suited. Many fabrics were conceived with easy elongation of the fabric in both directions of 25-30% so the fabrics could stretch smoothly in any form. Elasta in wool/nylon is a perfect example of a furniture fabric conceived for the Ball chairs designed by Eero Aarnio or the Groovy chairs designed by Pierre Paulin and produced by Artifort requiring this flexibility.

Jacquard fabrics had plenty of clear and controlled patterns. Colors remained gold, silver, and in shades of matte bronze. These were produced in Belgium and were mainly destined for the furniture industry. Asko, Artifort, B&B Italia, Cassina, Ligne Roset, Tecno, Saporiti Italia were just a few from the list of furniture factories buying Metsovaara fabrics. Hotel projects, cruise and ferries, railroad, and aircraft seats became more important for the mill in Sint-Niklaas. The mill developed ultra-light and extremely tight fabrics for airlines. British Airways and Finnair were supplied with dobby wefts. Sabena and Royal Air Maroc were supplied with jacquard wefts.

 

A special fabric was Seepra (zebra), designed by Alvar Aalto and improved by Marjatta Metsovaara. The weaving mill in Belgium was producing this fabric on particular Lentz shuttle jacquard looms for Artek. You can see the fabric on Alvar Aalto’s Tank chair and other of his furniture designs.

 

Back to history

Furniture fabrics

Metsovaara started producing furniture fabrics in 1954 for Artek and in large quantities for Asko. Furniture fabrics like Ripsi, Comfort I, and Comfort II were of high quality and had up to 40 color options. These fabrics were well suited to modern architecture and design furniture. The best example was Comfort II (60% viscose/40% wool), launched in 1960 with the most extensive color range for which Marjatta Metsovaara got the Gold Medal at the XII Triennial in Milan. It was made to feel more pleasant and shinier than the Comfort I in 100% wool which was also presented there.  Another example was the Ilo (joy) fabrics with black cotton warp in uni or different striped designs (10% cotton/25% rayon/65% wool). These wonderful fabrics were mainly used for projects.

Modern furniture showed curved and concave surfaces on which Metsovaara’s smooth, flexible and hard wear-resistant upholstery fabrics were well suited. Many fabrics were conceived with easy elongation of the fabric in both directions of 25-30% so the fabrics could stretch smoothly in any form. Elasta in wool/nylon is a perfect example of a furniture fabric conceived for the Ball chairs designed by Eero Aarnio or the Groovy chairs designed by Pierre Paulin and produced by Artifort requiring this flexibility.

Jacquard fabrics had plenty of clear and controlled patterns. Colors remained gold, silver, and in shades of matte bronze. These were produced in Belgium and were mainly destined for the furniture industry. Asko, Artifort, B&B Italia, Cassina, Ligne Roset, Tecno, Saporiti Italia were just a few from the list of furniture factories buying Metsovaara fabrics. Hotel projects, cruise and ferries, railroad, and aircraft seats became more important for the mill in Sint-Niklaas. The mill developed ultra-light and extremely tight fabrics for airlines. British Airways and Finnair were supplied with dobby wefts. Sabena and Royal Air Maroc were supplied with jacquard wefts.

 

A special fabric was Seepra (zebra), designed by Alvar Aalto and improved by Marjatta Metsovaara. The weaving mill in Belgium was producing this fabric on particular Lentz shuttle jacquard looms for Artek. You can see the fabric on Alvar Aalto’s Tank chair and other of his furniture designs.

 

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