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Finnish bungalow

Marjatta Metsovaara, in 1969 admired a Finnish bungalow exhibited at a construction fair at the Enso Gutzeit pavilion in Helsinki and designed by architect Juhani Katainen. She bought it and had it reassembled close to her factory in Sint-Niklaas, Belgium.

The place was a showcase of Metsovaara textiles with furniture designed by Eero Aarnio (Asko), Pierre Paulin (Artifort), Richard Schultz (Knoll). Metsovaara was producing furniture fabrics for each of these companies. The fabric was mainly the uni fabric Elasta, woven at the mill nearby.

When the bungalow came ready, a great opening party for Finnair was organized. Finnair airplanes had their seat fabrics made at the weaving mill in Sint-Niklaas, and Marjatta Metsovaara was flying monthly between Helsinki and Brussels.

Designs she made in the bungalow were sent to the production mill in Sint-Niklaas, or to the mill in Urjalankylä, where test lengths were produced before her approval. The print designs she drew or painted on paper were sent directly to Tampella.

Back to history

Finnish bungalow

Marjatta Metsovaara, in 1969 admired a Finnish bungalow exhibited at a construction fair at the Enso Gutzeit pavilion in Helsinki and designed by architect Juhani Katainen. She bought it and had it reassembled close to her factory in Sint-Niklaas, Belgium.

The place was a showcase of Metsovaara textiles with furniture designed by Eero Aarnio (Asko), Pierre Paulin (Artifort), Richard Schultz (Knoll). Metsovaara was producing furniture fabrics for each of these companies. The fabric was mainly the uni fabric Elasta, woven at the mill nearby.

When the bungalow came ready, a great opening party for Finnair was organized. Finnair airplanes had their seat fabrics made at the weaving mill in Sint-Niklaas, and Marjatta Metsovaara was flying monthly between Helsinki and Brussels.

Designs she made in the bungalow were sent to the production mill in Sint-Niklaas, or to the mill in Urjalankylä, where test lengths were produced before her approval. The print designs she drew or painted on paper were sent directly to Tampella.

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