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Development of artistic expression

Arttu Brummer was a leading figure in the School of Art and Design and Marjatta’s first teacher. Hand spinning and hand weaving was his motto, and he saw a textile artist in Marjatta. Other talented artists at the same school at the same time were Olli Borg, Erik Bruun, Yki Nummi, Timo Sarpaneva, Nanny Still and Maija Isola. Glass designer Nanny Still and the textile designer Marjatta Metsovaara became good friends when they organised together exhibitions both at home and abroad,  and this started already end of the 1940s. Other students from the same school who collaborated with Marjatta Metsovaara designing hotel interiors were interior decorator Jorma Valve (Expo 69) and Architect Pauli Lehtinen (Hotel Kuusamo in 1966, Hotel Hesperia in 1971, Hotel Intercontinental Helsinki in 1971).

The training throughout the 1920s till the 1960s was focused on weaving and the development of artistic expression. After WWII, imported fabrics were acquired mainly from England, Germany and Japan. Ingenious ideas came with man-made fibres, paper and paper cord because there was a lack of wool and cotton.

Tampella Oy was the first factory in Finland to use a Finnish artist in the role of the model designer. Dora Jung began designing damask models for Tampella in the 1930s and was one of Marjatta’s teachers at the Arts and Crafts Academy.

Marjatta Metsovaara was a young designer that did not only compete with her predecessors’ achievements but also brought out new views and ideas which better fit the styles of the 1950s and 1960s. She transformed the concept of fabrics with curtains and furniture fabrics produced at Villaythtymä Oy, presenting colour scales never seen before and using new materials like Dralon. The success achieved by Finland in the Milan Triennial in 1957 and 1960 (Gold Medal) influenced the entire 1960s. The artist’s name stepped out of the star cult in the 1950s to the guaranty of quality.  For the first time, artists appeared in weekly magazines with colour photos.

Among the most notable designers in the 1950s and 1960s were Eero Aarnio, Yrjö Kukkapuro, Esko Pajamies, Oiva Toikka, Nanny Still and Marjatta Metsovaara.

Back to history

Development of artistic expression

Arttu Brummer was a leading figure in the School of Art and Design and Marjatta’s first teacher. Hand spinning and hand weaving was his motto, and he saw a textile artist in Marjatta. Other talented artists at the same school at the same time were Olli Borg, Erik Bruun, Yki Nummi, Timo Sarpaneva, Nanny Still and Maija Isola. Glass designer Nanny Still and the textile designer Marjatta Metsovaara became good friends when they organised together exhibitions both at home and abroad,  and this started already end of the 1940s. Other students from the same school who collaborated with Marjatta Metsovaara designing hotel interiors were interior decorator Jorma Valve (Expo 69) and Architect Pauli Lehtinen (Hotel Kuusamo in 1966, Hotel Hesperia in 1971, Hotel Intercontinental Helsinki in 1971).

The training throughout the 1920s till the 1960s was focused on weaving and the development of artistic expression. After WWII, imported fabrics were acquired mainly from England, Germany and Japan. Ingenious ideas came with man-made fibres, paper and paper cord because there was a lack of wool and cotton.

Tampella Oy was the first factory in Finland to use a Finnish artist in the role of the model designer. Dora Jung began designing damask models for Tampella in the 1930s and was one of Marjatta’s teachers at the Arts and Crafts Academy.

Marjatta Metsovaara was a young designer that did not only compete with her predecessors’ achievements but also brought out new views and ideas which better fit the styles of the 1950s and 1960s. She transformed the concept of fabrics with curtains and furniture fabrics produced at Villaythtymä Oy, presenting colour scales never seen before and using new materials like Dralon. The success achieved by Finland in the Milan Triennial in 1957 and 1960 (Gold Medal) influenced the entire 1960s. The artist’s name stepped out of the star cult in the 1950s to the guaranty of quality.  For the first time, artists appeared in weekly magazines with colour photos.

Among the most notable designers in the 1950s and 1960s were Eero Aarnio, Yrjö Kukkapuro, Esko Pajamies, Oiva Toikka, Nanny Still and Marjatta Metsovaara.

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