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Clothing fabrics

In the 1950s, Marjatta Metsovaara composed color combinations and a few patterns for wool clothing made by Villayhtymä Oy.

Salon Leninkitukku ’s (dress wholesale of Salo) Finn-Flare collection of models was designed by Maj Kuhlefelt. Marjatta Metsovaara made the pattern designs and created materials for this collection in 1960. The collection included 11 sets of wool clothing fabrics, each set comprising seven colors where suits, jackets, skirts, and sports dresses were made of. Marjatta Metsovaara made Finn-Flare growing, and the collection was exported not only to the Scandinavian countries but also to Germany, France, and the USA. The success of the Finn-Flare collection was enormous, and the collection was later expanded with coats, hats, bags, and even footwear.

Risto Laaksonen from Salon Leninkitukku also asked Marjatta Metsovaara to make print designs for a new Finn-Flare collection in 1962. Kukka was the first print design Marjatta Metsovaara made and was produced at Tampella. Her knowledge in textile brought the launch of a new quality ideal for multi-use, which was named Lappi satin, and the pattern was improved with repeat for Metsovaara’s own use in a width of 130-135cm.

Finn Flare wished to offer a protest against dull and conventional clothes. Colors were challenging and burning, and the color scale was enormous, with dresses mostly in 2-colorways. Modern Scandinavian but not flamboyant, elegant, and sporty fitting for all age groups, Finn-Flare is meant for the woman of today who is caught up in the active life.

An unknown field of work is textiles for church purposes. These were jacquard designs meant for priests and altar cloths. And a fact is that there’s a Byzantine influence in many of her textile designs. The most beautiful chocolate boxes of Fazer were made covered with Metsovaara printed fabrics.

After her work with Finn-Flare, she did not continue designing for clothing companies until she made a series of designs of pile fabrics for Finnpile Oy in 1994 and silk scarfs for Green & Green in 2000. Canepa SpA in Como, Italy, produced silk scarves for Marjatta Metsovaara’s use during 2010.

Back to history

Clothing fabrics

In the 1950s, Marjatta Metsovaara composed color combinations and a few patterns for wool clothing made by Villayhtymä Oy.

Salon Leninkitukku ’s (dress wholesale of Salo) Finn-Flare collection of models was designed by Maj Kuhlefelt. Marjatta Metsovaara made the pattern designs and created materials for this collection in 1960. The collection included 11 sets of wool clothing fabrics, each set comprising seven colors where suits, jackets, skirts, and sports dresses were made of. Marjatta Metsovaara made Finn-Flare growing, and the collection was exported not only to the Scandinavian countries but also to Germany, France, and the USA. The success of the Finn-Flare collection was enormous, and the collection was later expanded with coats, hats, bags, and even footwear.

Risto Laaksonen from Salon Leninkitukku also asked Marjatta Metsovaara to make print designs for a new Finn-Flare collection in 1962. Kukka was the first print design Marjatta Metsovaara made and was produced at Tampella. Her knowledge in textile brought the launch of a new quality ideal for multi-use, which was named Lappi satin, and the pattern was improved with repeat for Metsovaara’s own use in a width of 130-135cm.

Finn Flare wished to offer a protest against dull and conventional clothes. Colors were challenging and burning, and the color scale was enormous, with dresses mostly in 2-colorways. Modern Scandinavian but not flamboyant, elegant, and sporty fitting for all age groups, Finn-Flare is meant for the woman of today who is caught up in the active life.

An unknown field of work is textiles for church purposes. These were jacquard designs meant for priests and altar cloths. And a fact is that there’s a Byzantine influence in many of her textile designs. The most beautiful chocolate boxes of Fazer were made covered with Metsovaara printed fabrics.

After her work with Finn-Flare, she did not continue designing for clothing companies until she made a series of designs of pile fabrics for Finnpile Oy in 1994 and silk scarfs for Green & Green in 2000. Canepa SpA in Como, Italy, produced silk scarves for Marjatta Metsovaara’s use during 2010.

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